Apr 17, 2014
Here’s my alternate cover for BOOM! Studios’ The Empty Man, art directed by the awesome Chris Rosa. I know I’m totally biased, but this story is phenomenal. Read up about it here:http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=52199 And while you’re at it, check out Vanesa R. Del Rey’s alternate cover and interior art. It is stunningly beautiful!

Here’s my alternate cover for BOOM! Studios’ The Empty Man, art directed by the awesome Chris Rosa. I know I’m totally biased, but this story is phenomenal. Read up about it here:
http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=52199
And while you’re at it, check out Vanesa R. Del Rey’s alternate cover and interior art. It is stunningly beautiful!

Apr 15, 2014
ibrill:

In honor of his birthday, here’s Goni Montes' cover for the upcoming RoboCop #1 (our new series, debuting in July), from the exclusive CBR interview with writer Joshua Williamson.
In developing this series we worked hard to make sure it felt different than any other RoboCop series. The property has been around for a long time, and a lot of different publishers have done RoboCop comics. How would we stand out? In Williamson’s interview you’ll see how we tackle that question in terms of story. We plan to concentrate on the “crime” angle. The original film hit a beautiful balance between being both a science fiction and crime story, and it’s something that felt lost as the franchise continued. We want to see if we can achieve that balance again. 
In terms of covers, we also wanted to do something that had never been seen in RoboCop comics before. There are many approaches to take, and you may see them across some variants. But in terms of the “A” covers we thought it would be interesting to have Goni, who has done amazing cover work on Clive Barker’s Next Testament and was recently nominated for a Spectrum 21 award, approach RoboCop with a sense of surrealism. Alex Murphy’s story is one of identity, with competing allegiances battling themselves inside a mind that is part man and part machine. Goni’s approach illustrates that internal struggle with a startling visual imagination, as the above cover makes clear. As the series continues you will see Murphy and Anne Lewis’ battles, both internal and external, turned into beautiful masterpieces by this distinct talent.

Now this is a birthday gift! Such kind words!
To say the least, I love working with BOOM! and I guess it’s safe to let you all know we’ll be working together on some pretty fun Robocop covers. It’s as exciting as it is scary. Such a high profile story with such a solid fanbase. I better get this right. :D

ibrill:

In honor of his birthday, here’s Goni Montes' cover for the upcoming RoboCop #1 (our new series, debuting in July), from the exclusive CBR interview with writer Joshua Williamson.

In developing this series we worked hard to make sure it felt different than any other RoboCop series. The property has been around for a long time, and a lot of different publishers have done RoboCop comics. How would we stand out? In Williamson’s interview you’ll see how we tackle that question in terms of story. We plan to concentrate on the “crime” angle. The original film hit a beautiful balance between being both a science fiction and crime story, and it’s something that felt lost as the franchise continued. We want to see if we can achieve that balance again. 

In terms of covers, we also wanted to do something that had never been seen in RoboCop comics before. There are many approaches to take, and you may see them across some variants. But in terms of the “A” covers we thought it would be interesting to have Goni, who has done amazing cover work on Clive Barker’s Next Testament and was recently nominated for a Spectrum 21 award, approach RoboCop with a sense of surrealism. Alex Murphy’s story is one of identity, with competing allegiances battling themselves inside a mind that is part man and part machine. Goni’s approach illustrates that internal struggle with a startling visual imagination, as the above cover makes clear. As the series continues you will see Murphy and Anne Lewis’ battles, both internal and external, turned into beautiful masterpieces by this distinct talent.

Now this is a birthday gift! Such kind words!

To say the least, I love working with BOOM! and I guess it’s safe to let you all know we’ll be working together on some pretty fun Robocop covers. It’s as exciting as it is scary. Such a high profile story with such a solid fanbase. I better get this right. :D

Apr 4, 2014

Check for your art. Pass around.

Just found out that this apparel company, DopestThreads.com, has been lifting, using & selling my artwork without permission. It’s very likely I’m not the only artist whose art they’re lifting. I’m passing this around in case they’re using any of my friends’ and colleagues’ art without permission.


I was able to find their contact information. If you find your work and wish to let them know it’s not cool, message me.

Feb 25, 2014

A couple more questions…

1. What was UPR like? What made you choose grad school at SCAD?

UPR Mayagüez, was fruitful but not in a professional manner. I ended up in UPR out of persuasion. It’s a very prestigious university. My father went there. Ever since I was young he made it a deal to push for it. I knew it was a bad idea but I didn’t question him at the time. I ended up there.

This school specializes in engineering and sciences. By the time I switched majors, it was too late for me to transfer to an art school without losing almost my whole bachelor’s degree. I switched to the UPR Mayagüez Art Department. I think at the time the whole department had less than 100 students. The program was scattered and classes were very difficult to find. The university itself doesn’t care much for such a small department, which sucks, cuz the faculty is stellar and what they provide for the students is many times what the university provides for them to teach.

What I took from UPR Mayagüez was a group of friends that I love and relationships with professors that I deeply respect for their incredible efforts to educate under the circumstances the college provided. Both groups of people contain some of the most intelligent, hard-working people I will ever meet.

Unfortunately, my BFA left me with few marketable skills. I had to go to grad school to cover many gaps. I chose SCAD cuz they’re loud. It wasn’t the best reason to choose a grad school but I lucked out. I ended up in SCAD Atlanta under the tutelage of Rick Lovell, Julie Mueller-Brown, and Bill & Lee Mayer. In a few years they prepped me entirely for the business. Seriously, it’s kinda crazy how those four people turned my flaky portfolio and had me freelancing for big clients in less than three years.

2. What were the most difficult aspects you faced in school and how are they different now?

My damn, embarrassing attitude! It was tough for my teachers to deal with my fluctuating moods. I vacillated from being overconfident in my (few) skills to being absolutely self-deprecating when I remembered how little I could really do. So technically, I’d start a project with full confidence, not accepting much direction. Then critique came and I notice how incredibly bad my project had turned out and how little I had learned.

Teachers weren’t mean about this though. Little by little they opened my eyes. I’m very happy to say that now, although my highs aren’t particularly high, I don’t experience lows often anymore. I’m confident in my work but I know I’m countless miles away from those that are best in the biz. And here’s the useful result: I don’t freak out about that anymore. I just work to try and keep up.

3. What was working at Puerto Rico Sea Grant like? What did you learn?

It was fun and it helped with the bills. Ultimately, it was a federal grant and space for growth is hard to find within those. I really miss those coworkers though.

I learned to wake up every morning and draw for a living. Sounds easy enough, but truthfully the routine can be very difficult to build.

This job also helped me define a next step. The tasks were split between illustration and design. The illustration aspect was much more fun for me. So when it came time to choose between a masters in graphic design vs a masters in illustration, I chose the latter.

4. Did you have a secondary job while you built your freelance career?

I became Bill Mayer’s assistant while still in grad school. Once I graduated, I had to quit as I had enough freelance and it was time to let someone else have the chance of working with Bill. Shortly after, I got a part-time teaching job. I stopped recently though cuz freelance reached a point where it won’t let me share my time anymore.

5. How has your work evolved?

I guess at first I depended a lot on draftsmanship and figure drawing, while avoiding everything else. Then I started honing my draftsmanship skills and drawing a lot more stuff than just figures in ethereal abstract environments. Recently, I felt that was covered enough for me to hone more advanced painting skills, and that’s where I am right now.

Feb 20, 2014
powpowhammer asked: hello! is it okay to reblog things from your portfolio that are not on your tumblr (with link and credit, of course)? I would like to have your 'glitches' piece in my blog to look at, as it is beautiful.

Thanks so much for asking! It’s very kind of you. Sure thing, go ahead.

Feb 20, 2014
hplowrightart asked: I adore your work!its beautiful :') i was just wondering if there you had any sketches or even better speed paint videos, i would love to see them!

Hey there! Thank you!

There’s a whole bunch of sketches in my process blog. As for speed paintings, I don’t have many, but I was recorded doing a demo. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have any sound. Sorry :(

ImagineFX is gonna publish an issue on pinups and they will provide a couple of my speed paintings and some answers to a few questions. I can’t seem to find a link just yet, but it’s coming out soon.

Feb 17, 2014
atarasenko:

There is no room for privacy in art. #art #musings #thoughts #minisketch #penandink #blackandwhite #ithinkthereforeifart

I couldn’t agree more.

atarasenko:

There is no room for privacy in art. #art #musings #thoughts #minisketch #penandink #blackandwhite #ithinkthereforeifart

I couldn’t agree more.

Jan 16, 2014
A neat feature for Golf Magazine. It was so much fun drawing that beard!

A neat feature for Golf Magazine. It was so much fun drawing that beard!

Jan 16, 2014
Cover for Clive Barker’s Next Testament #11. Probably my favorite of the bunch. Maybe.

Cover for Clive Barker’s Next Testament #11. Probably my favorite of the bunch. Maybe.

Oct 30, 2013
wastelandqueen asked: hey i'm looking at your art as art that influenced me for my college project, i love your illustrations! i just thought you might like to know:) thank you for doing what you do

umm…  =^_^=

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